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adrian del maestro
Adrian Del Maestro
Professor

Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics
Office: 306 South College
Phone: 865-974-7998
Adrian.DelMaestro@utk.edu
Group Website


Brief Vita
  • PhD, Physics, Harvard University (2008)
  • MS, Physics, Yale University (2005)
  • MSc, Physics, University of Waterloo (2003)
  • BS, Physics and Math, University of Waterloo (2002)

  • Professor, Physics and Astronomy, and Min H. Kao Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Tennessee, Knoxville (2020)
  • Director, Vermont Advanced Computing Core, Burlington, VT (2019-2020)
  • Director (Interim), Vermont Advanced Computing Core, Burlington, VT (2017)
  • Associate Professor, Physics, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT (2017)
  • Faculty, Materials Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT (2011)
  • Assistant Professor, Physics University of Vermont, Burlington, VT (2011) Postdoctoral Fellow Institute for Quantum Matter, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (2010)
  • Postdoctoral Scientist, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (2008)

Selected Honors
  • International Travel Research Award, University of Vermont (2017)
  • Organizer’s Poster Prize, International Conference on Quantum Fluids and Solids, Prague, Czech Republic (2016)
  • Maxwell Cup, Undergraduate Physics Teaching Award, University of Vermont (2015)
  • International Travel Research Award, University of Vermont (2015)
  • International Travel Research Award, University of Vermont (2013)
  • Post Graduate Scholarship B, NSERC, Canada (2007)

Research Areas

Quantum Matter

We are a research group focused on studying how collective and cooperative states of matter emerge in quantum many-body systems. We employ the tools of theoretical physics to study phase transitions, dimensional crossover and entanglement in quantum fluids, ultra-cold bosonic gases, superconductors and topological states of matter. This includes using quantum field theory in tandem with the development of novel high-performance computational algorithms for the study of strongly interacting quantum matter. We specialize in the low dimensional spatial continuum, where strong fluctuations preclude any long range ordered phases, and instead a type of universal liquid description is appropriate. Ultimately, we hope to learn how to harness the unique correlations present in all quantum-mechanical phases for high-precision measurement, secure long-distance communication and non-classical computation.

  • Quantum Entanglement
  • Quantum Nanofluidics
  • Wetting & Adsorption
  • Algorithmic Development for the Quantum Many-Body Problem
  • Quantum Phase Transitions
  • Infinite Randomness

Selected Recent Publications

Google Scholar Profile


 

 

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